• W. Austin Gardner

Do you find your strength in sitting still?


We need to take one step further, and we reach another equally simple but equally vital truth. “God would have all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.”


The salvation is broad enough to cover the sin of all mankind. The rescue is ample for the ruin of the race. How shall the unsaved be reached?


Behold again how divinely simple is the thought of God: let every believer become a witness—let every man, who is saved, seek to save. It is no irreverence to say that God’s whole idea of missions may be found, in essence, in that one word, witnessing.


The salvation of God is full and free. To accept it freely is immediate justification; to accept it fully is complete sanctification; to witness to it fully and freely is complete service—it is to be a missionary wherever we are.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 27.


The great bulk of professing Christians have no systematic work for unsaved souls; many of them have never yet even looked upon it as a duty to seek and to save that which was lost.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 29.


The bulk of church members find their strength in sitting still—it is only the few to whom it is a necessary part of a Christian life to bestir themselves, and serve—to give alms and minister to want and woe—to teach others the truth, to win others for Christ, to bear a dying world on the heart, and by prevailing prayer and daily testimony seek by all means to save some.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 36.

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