• W. Austin Gardner

A T Pierson speaks


Our doubts, instead of being our glory, are our shame—they come from minding earthly things, from living on a low level, and walking according to the course of this world.


To preach is to proclaim as a herald; to witness is to testify from personal knowledge. The two widely and essentially differ, yet they complement each other. A herald is only the mouth of a message; a witness is the mouth of an experience. The public crier may announce or proclaim, for hire, tidings in which he feels no interest, and of the truth of which he has no knowledge. But a witness can speak only what he knows and testify only what he has seen, heard, felt. He is a herald, indeed, and a herald of good tidings, but he is more—he is an example and proof of their verity and value. And therefore only a believer can be a witness.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 42.


Let this be engraven on our hearts: that no human being is prepared to proclaim the good tidings, unless, and except so far as, those tidings have become to him or to her the means of salvation and sanctification.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 43


The poorest, humblest, most unlettered believer, who has known penitence and faith, can do a work for God to which Gabriel himself would be unequal.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 44.


Before the Church can “convert the world,” the Church must be converted.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 48.


The only hope of the race is that, as in apostolic times, the whole Church shall become a body of evangelists, and every converted soul consider it a necessary part of discipleship to witness to all men that Christ died for all.


Arthur T. Pierson, The Divine Enterprise of Missions (New York: Baker & Taylor Co., 1891), 53–54.

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